January Exams: The Trouble for Students

2.5 minute read

Illustration of a student studying
Illustration of a student studying
Illustration of a student studying
Illustration of a student studying

January is a common time for exams and assessments, be that in universities or schools. In further education, it’s normally the month mock exams take place, whilst in higher education, first-term modules often conclude with January assessments.

This can be stressful for students. Going from the festive season straight into a period of intense revision is quite the change of pace.

It’s important to make sure they’re given the support that they need to succeed.

Where it’s especially challenging…

Students who already struggle with things like slow reading and processing speeds, working memory deficit, difficulties with concentration, fatigue or low motivation can find revision especially difficult.

Many students have never even been taught how to go about memorisation, but the majority of timed assessments rely on it more than anything. References, dates, case studies, formulas, or whatever else: students need to be able to recall information in a pressured environment.

Without these skills, and when already faced with learning challenges, it’s no wonder some students find exams so stressful.

What can be done?

Making sure students know the best ways to memorise information is a good start. This could be through study skills sessions or making use of online resources.

We’ve written previously about the remarkable efficiency of spaced repetition and how it can be used to overcome the Forgetting Curve. Any student revising for a timed assessment would benefit from knowing about these theories; they’ve been repeatedly proven in practice and give the best possible chance of memorising information.

Engaging in active recall also makes revising more interesting and more effective. Rather than re-reading notes, when a student actively tests themselves on content, it creates stronger neural pathways. That makes it easier to recall that same information again later on, say, in an exam.

Putting it all together

When we made Luna, we kept all of these learning theories in mind. Combining them all in one place creates the most efficient and engaging way to learn.

Luna’s smart scheduling combines the forgetting curve and active recall with the user’s own learning profile. This creates a revision schedule optimised for each individual learner.

Flashcards are also a well-recognised way of engaging in active recall. Using them requires students to summon information rather than consume it passively. It’s much more interesting than sifting through old notes, too.

Through AI, Luna creates flashcards instantly on any topic or from any learning resource. It removes many of the barriers to revision faced by students with learning difficulties. Luna combines modern technology with time-tested learning theories to create the most efficient revision experience for them.

Getting Luna

In January, to help with exams, we’re offering any student who has gone through the DSA a one-month licence for Luna. We want to make sure anyone who could benefit has the option to do so.

We’re offering any schools trial licences to give to their students. Luna has the potential to make revision easier for any student, and we want to help as many as possible.

If you’re an institution interested in setting up a trial, please get in touch.

Marketing Executive

Curtis is a former student with the University of Leeds, and now hopes to help current students get the most out of their studies. Prior to Booost Curtis worked in the energy industry, where he supported disabled customers during the COVID-19 pandemic before making the move to marketing.

Marketing Executive

Curtis is a former student with the University of Leeds, and now hopes to help current students get the most out of their studies. Prior to Booost Curtis worked in the energy industry, where he supported disabled customers during the COVID-19 pandemic before making the move to marketing.

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